About Brian

Before sewing clothes, I started sewing hair (!) back in 2003, making hair extensions for my hair salon in Las Vegas. My first sewing machine was given to me by a drag queen. It was a 1957 Kenmore and I still have it.

I grew up with a mother who made us clothes. I remember watching TV with the sound of the sewing machine rumbling above our heads. Our clothes were very basic back then: elastic waist shorts, simple button down shirts, and for winter she made jackets. My grandmother also sewed and did more intricate work including home decor items that I remember being in awe of as a kid. Unfortunately neither thought to teach me how to sew.

My Mom's machine was available and while she didn't exactly discourage its use, she didn't encourage it either. (I had a fascination with taking things apart and she may have been a little uncomfortable leaving me with her machine.) My brother did some sewing when he was in high school and I can see him doing it again some day. Sewing is obviously in my blood, because I feel like I've been doing it for many, many years.

Besides one dress shirt back in 2003, I really started sewing clothing in the summer of 2008. I was irritated that I could not find a good swimsuit that fit properly and cost less than $50. I realized that they were basically just very expensive underwear, so I decided to do it myself. Since I didn't know spandex was supposed to be difficult it wasn't, and after I made bags and bags of rejects I finally got a pattern I loved. Things have progressed a lot since then.

At this point I'm obsessed with sewing and simply can't stop!

I have a fetish for old heavy sewing machines and the $1 table at Walmart. I have two Necchi Supernova's and another Kenmore I picked up for $2 at a thrift shop. My Kenmore serger came from Ebay, cost less than $75, and is a true work horse. My coverstitch machine also came from Ebay, but I usually think of ways to get around needing to use it. It's a good machine but takes practice. Someday I may try out a newer computerized machine but for now I don't really see any need. Garment industry workrooms are not using any computerized, electronic, or plastic equipment so why should I?

Usually I pick a pattern and sew it until I know and understand everything about it and get the fit perfect. I end up with a pile of rejects and a deep understanding of construction details. Thankfully, the longer I sew the smaller the reject pile gets on new projects.

I've done swimwear, underwear, jeans, slacks, t-shirts and lots of button down shirts. I'm about to get into the dress shirts more, and after that, things like sweatshirts with zippers and hoods. I may even sew a suit at some point but don't have any place to wear one right now. I really like focusing on street wear clothes that everyday people wear everyday.

I have eclectic style and enjoy doing unique things. People expect the unexpected when I'm around.


4 comments :: About Brian

  1. I can't believe you've only been sewing for such a short time. Your work is amazing!

  2. Thanks Joe! Like everything else, it takes patience, practice, and a sense of humor...

  3. I also got my Kenmore machine from eBay for about $75. It's not old or heavy, but it's a fairly basic machine. I like it because it's sturdy and simple. I have never understood the appeal of computerized machines. I have one that I keep for buttonholes, but it's nothing special. I'm sure some of them are nice, but I just couldn't wrap my mind around those prices!

    I admire your ability to work with Wal-mart fabrics. I personally find those bargain fabrics very frustrating to work with, but I can see how that would be a great way to learn about and master all types of fabrics.

  4. Brian
    Have just found you and gone straight to the begining of your blog to read it. May I say, I am enchanted by your interest in creativity and sewing and you have really inspired me to enjoy my own. All I need now is to find a way of 'following' your blog to get all the latest.
    Kindest regards
    Karima, UK

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