A German love affair.....

I know it was just a few posts ago that I was professing my love for my new sweet Italian Necchi and justifying my need for two at the same time but I've found a new love.  I'm sure once the newness wears thin I'll reevaluate but for now...


I'd like you to meet Pfaff 260.  

A functional if not beautiful German treasure I picked up yesterday for the bargain basement price of only $25.  You may remember me mentioning that I had briefly owned a Pfaff 360 but that poor machine had so much previous damage it was unrepairable.  The 260 is identical to the 360 but without the free arm.  Some people swear by their free arm machines but I've never owned one and have never seen the need for my own sewing projects.  I've been told that a free arm is indispensable for sewing children's clothing and I can totally understand that.

There's so much to say about this machine!  First off it totally passed my super thick jeans top stitching thread in the bobbin test with flying colors.  Woohoo!!!  Besides my beloved Supernova(s) this is the only home machine that's been able to do this.  It also has a full rotary hook which is indispensable when sewing over elevation changes, simply put, it almost never skips a stitch no matter what.  The embroidery setup on this machine is mechanical and complicated but doesn't produce the same sophisticated designs as the Necchi.  That's ok, how often does one use those stitches anyway?

This machine is a direct drive type, meaning the motor is tied directly to the machine by a metal cogged belt and can't slip.  Personally I don't mind a machine with a regular belt but this is certainly an interesting setup.  I hear these cogged belts are difficult to get and not cheap so hopefully I won't need to replace mine anytime soon.

As always it totally intrigues me how the previous owner had the machine set up.  I have a feeling I might be the third owner of this machine because  to my eye it's obvious it's been used but not by the person who had it before me.  It came loaded with a class 15 bobbin which is not the right bobbin for this machine and the needle was also so blunt I could actually capture it's bluntness, take a look!  Can you imagine trying to sew with that?

What you say, not a class 15 bobbin!  Not a class 66 (L) either.  It uses the same bobbin system as my Pfaff 138 industrial does.  Here's a photo of the three bobbin styles side by side so you can see the differences.  The class 15 on the left, 66 middle and the "M" class bobbin on the right.  I've always found it strange that the industrial uses a smaller bobbin.  Normally I might be a little irritated at having to have another bobbin system to deal with but since I already had this size I got over that irritation a while back.  I use those silicone rubber doughnuts to keep each system tidy and it works out really well.

The machine came with a full set of manuals and supplemental books with some very funny illustrations and projects.  This one with the spools of thread walking around is very...  German?  I also gave it a good cleaning with my favorite machine wax.  This stuff is awesome and easy to use.  I think I picked it up at Walmart.  A bit on a microfiber towel and you'll be amazed how much dirt and grime come off your old vintage machine.

Because you know I love creating these little sewing machine music videos....  I'll also be doing an actual video review where I demonstrate stitching and other functions this weekend.  Which reminds me I have a pair of Burda shorts I need to photograph and show off as well.  It's going to be a busy weekend!

Enjoy!
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1 comments :: A German love affair.....

  1. Brian, I found your blog by way of the Selfish Seamstress, and what a deal you got. I have two Pfaff 230 machines; actually started my slipcover business with one.

    I'm constantly on the lookout for these machines and will snap up any I can get. I also had a not so great experience with the 330. Just couldn't get it to sew right.

    Love your blog!

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